A New Graveyard for Tobermore?

 

Belfast Newsletter 3rd January 1896 Edition

MAGHERAFELT BOARD OF GUARDIANS.- A special meeting was held yesterday- Mr. James Shivers, deputy vice-chairman, presiding. The other Guardians present were Colonel Sir W.F.L. Conyngham, K.C.B; Messrs. Andrew Brown, J.P.; Brigade-Surgeon Waters, C.B., J.P.; James Sinclair, J.P.; Wm. Eakin, J.P.; Thomas S. Ash, J.P.; W.J. Derby, J.P.; John Keenan, J. P.; Wm. Harbison, J.P.; Felix Ferran, J.P.; James Caldwell, Thomas Daley, J.P.; Daniel McKenna, James Garvin, Alexander Burnett, Thomas Shiels, George Mullan, Thomas Houston, Hugh Barkley, William Rutherford, J. P.; Robert Eakin, Wm. Anderson, Andrew Lattimar, Nicholas Mulholland, Joseph Carson, Charles Convery, Henry O’Neill, J.P.; Robert Bell, John O’Kane, Robert S. Murdock and Thomas Carleton.
… The Board was specially summoned to consider a memorial from ratepayers in Tobermore, praying that a public cemetery be provided by the Guardians for the district. A memorial against the proposal was presented by Mr. Anderson, Guardian of the division, the grounds of composition being –
1. That there are at present three burying-grounds around Tobermore, in which the members of the different Protestant Churches who have existing rights have full liberty to bury.
2. That it has always been customary for each of the denomination (the Baptist denomination excepted) in the division to provide a burying-ground of its own. Many members of the Baptist Church have undisputed right of interment both in the Parish Church and Presbyterian Church burying-grounds.
3. Under the foregoing circumstances there was no necessity for a cemetery being provided.
The memorial was influentially signed. Dr. Waters, C.B., J.P., Whitefort, in moving that a public burying-ground be provided, dwelt on the fact that one of the graveyards mentioned in the memorial was closed for upwards of twenty years, and that the Presbyterian graveyard was practically closed. Regarding the new parish church graveyard, the Church authorities had resolved that, except in a few instances, no one outside their own congregation would be allowed to bury there, consequently there was no place of burial. Mr. Caldwell seconded Dr. Waters’ proposition. Rev. Mr. Stevenson, Tobermore; Rev. G.K. Moriarty, Kilcronaghan; and several other laymen, appeared before the Board in support of the memorial against a public cemetery being provided, and were heard at length. Mr. Murdock moved, and Mr. Mulholland seconded, an amendment that a public cemetery be not provided, which, on a poll being taken. 19 votes for and 33 against.

1835 Free Letter to Captain Tennyson d’ Eyncourt of 46th Regiment of Foot

Before Stamps had been invented in 1840, this is how a letter would have looked. This one is a ‘free’ meaning that the person sending it had some kind of priveledge not to have to pay for his or her mail. This letter was posted in 1835 and was addressed to an officer in the 46th Regiment of Foot, who were obviously stationed at Maghera during that year.  This letter was addressed to Eustace Tennyson d’ Eyncourt, who was the youngest and favourite son of Charles Tennyson d’Eyncourt, a Member of Parliament, and it was he who posted the letter to his son. Does that name sound familiar? Eustace Tennyson d’Eyncourt, was the cousin of Alfred Tennyson, later Alfred, Lord Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson.. he of ‘The Charge of the Light Brigade’ fame. Unfortunately, this young army Captain died in Barbados in 1842.